Moth-Mixing with the Maori

IMG_1769After taking last week off of homeschooling, we picked right back up with our studies on Monday. We started late a few days since I was handling everything myself for a few days. Seth left for Zimbabwe Monday morning and was planned to return Wednesday by dinnertime. He and our teammate preached for a pastor’s conference. He returned early Wednesday morning however, after he and our teammate decided to drive through the night to get home.

Because of our “thief in the night” just a few weeks ago, I was jumpy at night without our patriarch home. I pulled some late-nighters and slept with doors barricaded and lights on, so I was relieved when Seth came home early. I was also reminded to be thankful for my husband’s helpfulness after just a few days of handling all of the housework, homeschooling, raising of children, and visitors to our home (ministry) without him! I wonder how military wives do it!

Colin found a bunch of grasshoppers in the field, and Caleb began keeping a few (outside!) for “pets.” “See?” I said. “You don’t need a dog for a pet!” (They’ve been wanting a dog, and we’re almost thinking about it after the break-in.)

IMG_1774

“Yeah,” he responded, “If T– comes, we can just have the grasshoppers jump on him!” haha!

We got through…well, here’s what we got through: Colin finished being introduced to all of his letters in phonics and was introduced to the “30” and “40” families, telling time (on the hour), and the nickel in math.

In math, Caleb studied telling time (minutes), and subtraction with regrouping. In language arts, he studied contractions, different spellings for the long “a” sound and functions of the silent “e,” copywork focusing on commas used in a series, and he read A Grain of Rice and The Pumpkin Runner. Both books had some vocabulary that was too difficult for a second grader, but the stories were excellent. I highly recommend The Pumpkin Runner. A Grain of Rice is a Chinese version of the mathematical folktale I mentioned from India that we read a few weeks ago, One Grain of Rice. Caleb enjoyed the latter book’s pictures more (and the vocabulary wasn’t as difficult); but I enjoyed the Chinese story more (it was more romantic). 🙂

I didn't have a picture to go off of, so just used my imagination. I make no claim to authenticity here!

I didn’t have a picture to go off of, so just used my imagination. I make no claim to authenticity here!

These books accompanied our history as we finished our studies of the Far East in China, Korea and Japan, and moved Down Under to Australia and New Zealand. We read of the Aborigines and the Maori and their cultures. I made “moth mix” (from Australia–basically just popcorn, peanuts, and honey) and painted the kids’ faces like the Maori (New Zealand) for lunch one day. Later they enjoyed watching the Disnesy movie Down Under.

The little stinker washed off some of his goatee before the picture.

The little stinker washed off some of his goatee before the picture.

Moth mix and open mouth. :)

Moth mix and open mouth. 🙂

IMG_1760We finished reading aloud a Newbery winner The Tale of Despereaux as a family, and it truly was a winner in our family! It was such a wonderful story. Humor in all the right places, adventure, an unlikely hero, determination, love, regret, forgiveness, compassion, and some almost-Christian themes, like light vs. darkness, a love for beauty and music, and the themes I already mentioned. There is a very sad section in there on the girl Miggery Sow. I noticed that the author Kate DiCamillo recently won yet another Newbery Medal in 2014 for her newest book Flora & Ulysses. Wish I had a library to go check it out to see if it’s as good!

In science we were wading in the shallow waters with pinnipeds–seals and sea lions this week. I believe I might even know the difference between them now if you asked me.

We drew for art, met our last picture in Come Look with Me (and I’m definitely going to try something different for art appreciation now–I think SCM here), listened to a Spanish dance in music (while painting our faces like New Zealand warriors…), and I read Romeo and Juliet after our poetry tea on Wednesday. Caleb drew a frangipani tree for his nature study. Our frangipani is not very big, but the big ones are beautiful!

Callie with our frangipani, when both were babies.

Callie with our frangipani, when both were babies.

Callie said a funny earlier this week. For Colin’s birthday, he got a storybook on the apostle Paul. We read it three nights in a row for family devotions, and one night I was thinking to myself, “Hmm, I bet this is a a bit difficult to decipher for little kids; there are so many places he travels and people he evangelizes.” Right when I thought that, I paused to turn the page, and Callie piped up, “He go to ‘nuther town?” 🙂

I made her a cat, instead of a Maori warrior.

I made her a cat, instead of a Maori warrior.

I have not read very much this week, unfortunately, and I’m getting behind on my 2014 reading goals. Seth came home with a new-to-me dryer, so I’m excited about the ability to take care of laundry at any time of day! Seth’s birthday is coming up, and we’re not having cake! 🙂

Enjoying a present he shared with Colin. These were recommended by My Father's World.

Enjoying a present he shared with Colin. These were recommended by My Father’s World.

Seth with one of LBI's former graduates whom he visited in Zim this week.

Seth with one of LBI’s former graduates whom he visited in Zim this week.

 

Seth came back with lots of stories I want to get around to telling someday about Zimbabwe and our friends ministering there. For just a small snapshot, they came home early because of difficulties with crossing the border, corrupt policemen, and obtaining petrol. And both of the national pastors there who graduated from our Bible institute are ministering under the most difficult conditions. They need your prayers. As do we!

 

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About Amy

I'm Amy, a missionary wife and mother of four children, blogging about our lives and perspectives on culture in South Africa.
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One Response to Moth-Mixing with the Maori

  1. I can’t wait wait to read all your stories–and your face painting looks great!

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